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Where Tech Items Work

Gregg Emmer, chief marketing officer for CounselorTop 40 distributor Kaeser & Blair (asi/238600), has noted that high-tech promotional items are often not exactly what high-tech clients are looking for when purchasing promotional products. They tend more toward traditional items that are practical and targeted to younger audience.

Target Tech sector with these products

So, on the flip side, what types of industries tend to be more receptive to the high-end, techy ad specialties? “We see many other businesses using technology items. For example, we had a hospital that managed their outpatient surgery center on flash drives,” Emmer says. “The patient would receive a drive with all their information and instructions. They would add the information to forms and then bring the drive to the hospital when they were scheduled. The processing then takes a few seconds. They can include X-rays and medical records and more on the drive.”

It may seem counterintuitive, considering the nature of the businesses that these companies operate in, but Emmer says non-tech sector clients seem to be more avid users of high-tech promotional products, and vice versa – partly because tech companies may see high-tech ad specialties as a rival rather than a complement to their brand.

“My point is that tech items – chargers, flash drives, smartphone accessories – work well for many non-tech clients, and basic items work well for tech clients,” Emmer says. “The goal is to deliver a message to a selected market with an appropriate item. A huge consideration is that many tech clients actually have branded retail products that our industry is in competition for. So, it’s necessary to be aware of this before making recommendations.”

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Where Tech Items Work

Gregg Emmer, chief marketing officer for CounselorTop 40 distributor Kaeser & Blair (asi/238600), has noted that high-tech promotional items are often not exactly what high-tech clients are looking for when purchasing promotional products. They tend more toward traditional items that are practical and targeted to younger audience.

Target Tech sector with these products

So, on the flip side, what types of industries tend to be more receptive to the high-end, techy ad specialties? “We see many other businesses using technology items. For example, we had a hospital that managed their outpatient surgery center on flash drives,” Emmer says. “The patient would receive a drive with all their information and instructions. They would add the information to forms and then bring the drive to the hospital when they were scheduled. The processing then takes a few seconds. They can include X-rays and medical records and more on the drive.”

It may seem counterintuitive, considering the nature of the businesses that these companies operate in, but Emmer says non-tech sector clients seem to be more avid users of high-tech promotional products, and vice versa – partly because tech companies may see high-tech ad specialties as a rival rather than a complement to their brand.

“My point is that tech items – chargers, flash drives, smartphone accessories – work well for many non-tech clients, and basic items work well for tech clients,” Emmer says. “The goal is to deliver a message to a selected market with an appropriate item. A huge consideration is that many tech clients actually have branded retail products that our industry is in competition for. So, it’s necessary to be aware of this before making recommendations.”

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Where Tech Items Work

Gregg Emmer, chief marketing officer for CounselorTop 40 distributor Kaeser & Blair (asi/238600), has noted that high-tech promotional items are often not exactly what high-tech clients are looking for when purchasing promotional products. They tend more toward traditional items that are practical and targeted to younger audience.

Target Tech sector with these products

So, on the flip side, what types of industries tend to be more receptive to the high-end, techy ad specialties? “We see many other businesses using technology items. For example, we had a hospital that managed their outpatient surgery center on flash drives,” Emmer says. “The patient would receive a drive with all their information and instructions. They would add the information to forms and then bring the drive to the hospital when they were scheduled. The processing then takes a few seconds. They can include X-rays and medical records and more on the drive.”

It may seem counterintuitive, considering the nature of the businesses that these companies operate in, but Emmer says non-tech sector clients seem to be more avid users of high-tech promotional products, and vice versa – partly because tech companies may see high-tech ad specialties as a rival rather than a complement to their brand.

“My point is that tech items – chargers, flash drives, smartphone accessories – work well for many non-tech clients, and basic items work well for tech clients,” Emmer says. “The goal is to deliver a message to a selected market with an appropriate item. A huge consideration is that many tech clients actually have branded retail products that our industry is in competition for. So, it’s necessary to be aware of this before making recommendations.”

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Where Tech Items Work

Gregg Emmer, chief marketing officer for CounselorTop 40 distributor Kaeser & Blair (asi/238600), has noted that high-tech promotional items are often not exactly what high-tech clients are looking for when purchasing promotional products. They tend more toward traditional items that are practical and targeted to younger audience.

Target Tech sector with these products

So, on the flip side, what types of industries tend to be more receptive to the high-end, techy ad specialties? “We see many other businesses using technology items. For example, we had a hospital that managed their outpatient surgery center on flash drives,” Emmer says. “The patient would receive a drive with all their information and instructions. They would add the information to forms and then bring the drive to the hospital when they were scheduled. The processing then takes a few seconds. They can include X-rays and medical records and more on the drive.”

It may seem counterintuitive, considering the nature of the businesses that these companies operate in, but Emmer says non-tech sector clients seem to be more avid users of high-tech promotional products, and vice versa – partly because tech companies may see high-tech ad specialties as a rival rather than a complement to their brand.

“My point is that tech items – chargers, flash drives, smartphone accessories – work well for many non-tech clients, and basic items work well for tech clients,” Emmer says. “The goal is to deliver a message to a selected market with an appropriate item. A huge consideration is that many tech clients actually have branded retail products that our industry is in competition for. So, it’s necessary to be aware of this before making recommendations.”

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Where Tech Items Work

Gregg Emmer, chief marketing officer for CounselorTop 40 distributor Kaeser & Blair (asi/238600), has noted that high-tech promotional items are often not exactly what high-tech clients are looking for when purchasing promotional products. They tend more toward traditional items that are practical and targeted to younger audience.

Target Tech sector with these products

So, on the flip side, what types of industries tend to be more receptive to the high-end, techy ad specialties? “We see many other businesses using technology items. For example, we had a hospital that managed their outpatient surgery center on flash drives,” Emmer says. “The patient would receive a drive with all their information and instructions. They would add the information to forms and then bring the drive to the hospital when they were scheduled. The processing then takes a few seconds. They can include X-rays and medical records and more on the drive.”

It may seem counterintuitive, considering the nature of the businesses that these companies operate in, but Emmer says non-tech sector clients seem to be more avid users of high-tech promotional products, and vice versa – partly because tech companies may see high-tech ad specialties as a rival rather than a complement to their brand.

“My point is that tech items – chargers, flash drives, smartphone accessories – work well for many non-tech clients, and basic items work well for tech clients,” Emmer says. “The goal is to deliver a message to a selected market with an appropriate item. A huge consideration is that many tech clients actually have branded retail products that our industry is in competition for. So, it’s necessary to be aware of this before making recommendations.”

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.